Clarionion: Professors use foursquare to take attendance

April 12, 2012 | 11 a.m.

The popular cell phone app is no longer just fun and games but is redefining technology in classrooms

Clarionion | Marsha M. Allo

Clarionion: Professors use foursquare to take attendance

No longer a children's game, foursquare becomes professors' best friend. | MCT

Professors have decided to accommodate students’ use of technology by requiring students to check in to their classes on foursquare. 

By doing this, professors will not have to worry about taking attendance, but rather the students will be required to mark their own attendance. 

Professors agreed that this would be a simple solution in solving the issue of attendance. 

“It’s so difficult to read off all those names,” explained professor Christopher Klorey. “Some students don’t hear their name called and then I end up just scanning the crowd to make sure everyone is there anyways. If the students were responsible for checking in, it would literally save me minutes of time.”

The professors are hoping that their classrooms become the most popular. In fact, they have started a competition to see which professor has the most check ins. Whoever has the most students check in within the semester will receive a cooked goose. 

Professors can taste the goose and already are excited for the new foursquare check ins, but students have mixed feelings. 

“Pretty much everyone has a smartphone now,” said sophomore Hannah Jasin. “This will really be pushing us into the 22nd century.”

“I think this is a good idea in theory, but in reality, not everyone has foursquare or access to it,” said student Nate Mixton. “This will just cause riots and complaints.”

“I don’t even know what foursquare is. I thought it was that game where everyone has a corner and they bounce the ball around…” pondered Bethel student Evan Green. 

The majority of students may use foursquare already so this could be just one more check in, but for those who are technologically impaired, this new requirement may be asking too much. 

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