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Our B.A. in Psychology is designed to custom-fit the lives of busy adults across the country. The program's online format allows you to complete your coursework in your home community, empowering you to apply what you’ve learned in your unique context. With dynamic enrollment, you can start any time and earn your degree in as few as two years.

You need to have 60 credits to start this program. Your enrollment counselor can help you explore your options for obtaining credits, including taking courses in our associate degree programs.

Online

Fully Online

You'll complete 100% of your coursework online.

Location: Online

Start Dates: Courses start every 6 weeks. Contact your enrollment counselor for details.

Total Credits

45

Finish in as Few as

2 years

Courses

  • Introduction to Psychology (PSYC100)

    Methods, theories, and principal findings of psychological investigation.

    3 credits

  • Lifespan Development (PSYC305)

    Identification of the various stages of life from conception to death. Examination of the perspectives of various developmental theorists and their role in historical, contemporary, and controversial issues. Analysis of the biosocial, cognitive, and psychosocial domains and their contribution to human development while maintaining a focus on individual differences.

    3 credits

  • Social Psychology (PSYC320)

    Behavior and experience of individuals and groups in relation to other individuals and groups. Theory, method, and findings in areas such as conformity, persuasion, social cognition, attraction, altruism, aggression, prejudice, group behavior, and applied topics.

    3 credits

  • Introduction to Statistics (PSYC335)

    Basic descriptive, correlational, and inferential statistics will be covered. As time permits, more advanced topics of ANOVA, multiple regression, ANCOVA, meta-analysis, and factor analysis will be introduced. Learners will perform analyses using a computerized statistical package, and primary emphasis will be placed on understanding the concepts and interpreting results correctly.

    3 credits

  • Abnormal Psychology (PSYC340)

    Classification, causes, symptoms, and treatment of various forms of psychopathology. Analysis of Christian and secular perspectives of psychopathology and a survey of some major issues in the field of mental health.

    3 credits

  • History of Psychology (PSYC360)

    Historical roots of contemporary psychology. Focus is on the influence of historical trends, people, and events on the evolution of psychological questions, constructs, methods, and issues.

    3 credits

  • Disabilities and Giftedness (PSYC370)

    Focus on the development of individuals with disabilities and giftedness from a lifespan perspective. Cognitive, physical,emotional, and sociocultural variables relevant to developmental delay; giftedness; learning disabilities; physical, sensory,and communication disabilities; emotional disturbance; and multiple disabilities. Critical analysis of psychosocial educational interventions. Service learning with those with disabilities.

    3 credits

  • Motivation and Emotion (PSYC380)

    How biological, environmental, cognitive, emotional, and personal systems interact to initiate and direct human behavior. How experimental psychologists study emotional and motivational systems.

    3 credits

  • Research Methods (PSYC400)

    Introduction to quantitative and qualitative research designs. Designed as a project-based course, with particular attention to program evaluation and action research, learners will construct an applied research proposal.

    3 credits

  • Principles of Counseling and Psychotherapy (PSYC410H)

    Introduction and analysis of major therapy systems from Christian and secular perspectives, basic counseling techniques, and current ethical issues facing the counseling professions. Designed for students planning graduate study in human services.

    3 credits

  • Advanced Psychopathology (PSYC430)

    Explores issues pertaining to the nature and occurrence of psychological disorders, including classification, cultural context,developmental considerations, etiology, and treatment. Critical evaluation of contemporary theory and research, including conceptualizations, methodologies, and statistical approaches.

    3 credits

  • Families in Cross-Cultural Perspective (PSYC435)

    Contemporary, historical, and cross-cultural, predominantly non-Western perspective on a variety of family systems and the people living in them. Values and assumptions underlying these systems, roles, intergenerational relationships, identity formation, and developmental tasks. Multicultural aspects of chemical dependency.

    3 credits

  • Introduction to Addictions Counseling (PSYC450)

    Examination of addiction from a variety of perspectives and evaluation of the twelve core functions of an addictions counselor. Description of the process of change in the context of the continuum of care. Cultivation of a personal philosophy around spirituality and addiction.

    3 credits

  • Psychology Internship and Seminar (PSYC480)

    Explores issues pertaining to the nature and occurrence of psychological disorders, including classification, cultural context, developmental considerations, etiology, and treatment. Critical evaluation of contemporary theory and research, including conceptualizations, methodologies, and statistical approaches.

    3 credits

  • Senior Seminar (PSYC490)

    Foundational issues in psychology and the interface of psychology, Christianity, and other disciplines. Includes an in-depth individual writing project.

    3 credits