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Joel Frederickson

Job Titles

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Frederickson's research interests include the psychological impact of apologies and how students change over four years from participating in college. This includes changes in cognition, beliefs, and spirituality.

Started at Bethel

1996

Education

  • Bethel College - B.A. in Psychology, 1989
  • University of Minnesota - M.A. , 1992
  • University of Minnesota - Ph.D. in Educational Psychology/Social Psychology, 1997

Biography

Frederickson is a professor in the undergraduate psychology department at Bethel, as well as associate dean of institutional assessment & accreditation. In his role as associate dean he assesses trends in student engagement, satisfaction, beliefs, attitudes, and cognition.

Publications

Lancaster, S., Larson, M. & Frederickson, J. (In Press). The many faces of evangelicalism: Identifying subgroups using latent class analysis. Psychology of Religion and Spirituality.

Berry, Z. & Frederickson, J. (2015). Explanations and implications of the fundamental attribution error: A review and proposal. Journal of Integrated Social Sciences, 5(1), 44-57. (Faculty sponsor)

Sandau KE, Sendelbach S, Fletcher L, Frederickson J, Drew BJ, &  Funk, M. (2015). Computer-assisted interventions improve QTc documentation in hospital patients receiving QT-prolonging drugs. American Journal of Critical Care, 24(2), 6-15.

Frederickson, J. (2010). I'm sorry, please don't hurt me: Apologies can reduce aggressive responses. Journal of Social Psychology, 150(6), 579-581.

Sandau, K., Mulligan, S., & Frederickson, J. (2010). National survey of cardiologists' awareness, perceptions, and standard of practice for continuous ST-segment monitoring. American Journal of Critical Care, 19, 112-123.

Presentations

Frederickson, J. (2019). The CLA+: Is it worth the money, time, and effort? Presented at the 2019 Association for Assessment & Learning in Higher Education conference in St. Paul, MN.

Frederickson, J. (2018). Prioritizing Data from National Standardized Instruments. Presented at the 2018 Association for Assessment & Learning in Higher Education conference in Salt Lake City, UT.

Frederickson, J. (2015). Assessing the Impact of Study Abroad. Presented at the 2015 Annual Higher Learning Commission Conference in Chicago, IL.

Frederickson, J. (2015). Costing Out Majors to Assist with Prioritization Processes. Presented at the 2015 Annual Higher Learning Commission Conference in Chicago, IL.

Frederickson, J. & Pinto, J. (2014). Rewarding Assessment. Presented at the 2014 Annual Higher Learning Commission Conference in Chicago, IL.

Frederickson, J. (2012). Signature Assignments: Tools for Authentic Assessment & Faculty Buy-in. Presented at the 2012 Annual Higher Learning Commission Conference in Chicago, IL.

Frederickson, J. (2011). Mining Existing Data to Inform Faculty Development. Presented at the 2011 Annual Higher Learning Commission Conference in Chicago, IL.

Frederickson, J. (2010). Assessment Driven Faculty Development. Presented at the 2010 Collaboration for the Advancement of Teaching & Learning Assessment Conference, Bloomington, MN.

Frederickson, J., Jones, K., and Christy, J. (2010). The Collegiate Learning Assessment: Is it worth the cost? Presented at the 2010 Collaboration for the Advancement of Teaching & Learning Assessment Conference, Bloomington, MN.

DeWiler, T., Sherry, R., & Frederickson, J. (2010). Stability Amidst Change: Assessment as Organizational Development. Presented at the 2010 Annual Higher Learning Commission Conference in Chicago, IL.

DetWiler, T., Frederickson, J., Holcomb, G., & Kale D. (2010). Strategies for Continually Improving the Achievement of Mission at Four CCCU Institutions. Presented at the 2010 Coalition for Christian Colleges & Universities International Conference in Atlanta, GA.

Professional Organizations, Committees, and Boards

American Psychological Society (APS)

Association for the Assessment of Learning in Higher Education (AALHE)

Areas of expertise

Frederickson's research interests include the psychological impact of apologies and how students change over four years from participating in college. This includes changes in cognition, beliefs, and spirituality.