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In Bethel's M.S. in Medical Sciences program, you’ll experience a curriculum equivalent to the first year of medical school, which will enhance your academic record and admission credentials, help improve your MCAT score, and equip you to be more successful in either a medical professional program or in the workforce.

Face to Face

Daytime

You'll meet during the day on campus.

Location: St. Paul

Start Dates: Fall 2022

Total Credits

42

Finish in as Few as

11 months

Courses

  • Anatomy, Embryology and Imaging (MDSC610)

    The Anatomy, Embryology & Imaging course consists of a detailed study of the normal structure, development, and organization of the human body. This course undertakes a regional approach rather than a systemic approach to Human Gross Anatomy, Embryology & Imaging is distributed into three block contents. Gross structures are studied in the laboratory by software modeling. The radiology component of Gross Anatomy serves as the introduction to radiology and prepares the student for further development. Lectures stress the contribution of developmental events to gross anatomical organization and the correlation of this organization with clinically relevant conditions.

    9 credits

  • Medical Biochemistry I (MDSC620)

    Medical Biochemistry is a five credit hour course designed to lay the foundation for other basic and clinical medical sciences. The goal of this course is to learn the core concepts of biochemistry that apply to human health and disease and to cite specific examples of their application. You will be able to analyze and evaluate the most common biochemistry cited in medical literature. Furthermore, these basics will facilitate further learning in biochemistry and the health sciences.

    5 credits

  • Physiology I (MDSC630)

    Physiology is the comprehensive study of the function of the human body on an organ system basis. Emphasis is on the integration of functions from the cellular level to that of the total organism and the application of physiology concepts to problem solving. The following units will be covered in the Physiology I course: Membrane and Action Potentials, Cellular and Systemic Physiology of the Cardiovascular and Respiratory Systems.

    4 credits

  • Histology and Cell Biology (MDSC640)

    Study of the many different aspects of the internal structure of cells, tissues and organs in the human body, presenting a comprehensive survey of many of their complex interrelationships.

    4 credits

  • Health Disparities (MDSC650)

    This course is designed to provide a general overview of gaps in health outcomes associated with health disparities. A special emphasis will be given to the social determinants of health such as race/ethnicity, social class, socioeconomic status, sex, sexuality, nationality, and migration status. The course will focus on the impact of health disparities' impact at multiple system's levels (e.g. Individual, patient-clinician, health care system, etc.).

    1 credits

  • Medical Biochemistry II (MDSC660)

    The major goal of the Biochemistry Course is to provide students with a complete understanding, at the molecular level, of all the chemical processes associated with living cells. Courses in the Basic Sciences Department aim to guide the student towards an understanding of basic biochemical concepts that deal with life processes.

    5 credits

  • Physiology II (MDSC670)

    Physiology is the comprehensive study of the function of the human body on an organ system basis. Emphasis is on the integration of functions from the cellular level to that of the total organism and the application of physiology concepts to problem solving. The following units will be covered in the Physiology II course: Gastrointestinal, Renal and Endocrine Physiology Systems.

    4 credits

  • Medical Microbiology (MDSC680)

    This course teaches students about all the most common pathogens involved in infectious illness and their characteristics. Students are also prepared their licensing examinations by providing the clinical knowledge and problem solving skills they need to approve them. Because it is very important for any physician to recognize, early in the course of any infectious disease, its etiologic agents, imparting this knowledge is the main goal and objective of the courses.

    4 credits

  • Medical Neuroscience (MDSC685)

    The Neuroscience Course will teach you brain function in health and disease. The course covers neuroanatomy/histology (33 lecture hours) and neurophysiology (21 lecture hours). There is also a brain dissection laboratory (7.5 hours), small group discussion sections (6 hours). For this course, efficient use of independent study time is essential.

    5 credits

  • Medical Ethics (MDSC690)

    This course will attempt to provide didactic experiences for medical students in specific areas within the field of medical ethics. The need for these experiences stems from the recognition that ethical dilemmas are inherent in medical care. Although dramatic issues such as cloning, abortion and organ donation have strong ethical implications, it is important to realize that the practicing doctor will face ethical decisions every day while solving more commonplace problems. Most everyday ethical questions have well- accepted answers; only the most difficult ethical questions seem to defy resolution. Even so, it is important for physicians to develop an understanding of the principles of medical ethics and a system of ethical reasoning that will result in consistent decisions.

    1 credits

  • Comprehensive Final Exam (MDSC700)

    Comprehensive examination after completion of the student's final didactic course.

    0 credits