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Physician Assistant Program Details

Master of Science

As a physician assistant student at Bethel, you’ll develop skills for comprehensive medical practice and build a balanced core of knowledge in the fields of natural and social sciences, medical sciences, behavioral sciences, and evidence-based medicine.

Face to Face

Daytime

You'll meet during the day on campus.

Location: St. Paul

Start Dates: Summer 2022, and Summer 2023

Total Credits

112

Program length

27 months

Courses

  • Human Gross Anatomy & Histology (BIOL600)

    Human anatomy for physician assistant students takes a regional approach to the study of human anatomy. This course will involve dissection of human cadavers by the students. Incorporated into the course content concerning anatomical structures will be a brief examination of histological structure, nervous system structure, and basic function.

    4 credits

    Corequisite Course: BIOL600L

  • Human Gross Anatomy and Histology Lab (BIOL600L)

    Laboratory experience accompanying BIOL600.

    2 credits

    Corequisite Course: BIOL600

  • Human Medical Physiology (BIOL610)

    This course is designed for graduate students to learn and gain knowledge in the physiological principles. These concepts are essential for further progress in understanding mechanisms of disease and body systems. This understanding is essential for clinical medicine. Weekly problem solving discussions will emphasize clinical application of physiologic concepts.

    3 credits

  • Pharmacology & Therapeutics I (BIOL620)

    This is the first course in a series of three clinical pharmacology courses taught in a systems-based approach with the Clinical Medicine series. The course explores clinical implications of pharmacology for these topics (but not limited to): hematologic, cardiovascular, pulmonary, genitourinary, and renal.

    3 credits

  • Medical Pathophysiology I (BIOL621)

    This is the first of three pathophysiology courses offered concurrently with the Clinical Medicine series. Pathophysiology at the molecular, cellular, organ, and total body levels will be applied in each organ system. Systems covered include, but are not limited to: hematologic, cardiovascular, pulmonary, genitourinary, and renal.

    2 credits

  • Pharmacology & Therapeutics II (BIOL630)

    This is the second course in a series of three clinical pharmacology courses taught in a systems-based approach with the Clinical Medicine series. The course explores clinical implications of pharmacology for these topics (but not limited to); dermatologic, endocrine, neurologic, psychiatric, musculoskeletal/ rheumatologic, gastrointestinal, and geriatric.

    4 credits

    Corequisite Course: BIOL631;PHAS603;PHAS603L;PHAS613;PHAS623L

  • Medical Pathophysiology II (BIOL631)

    This is the second of three pathophysiology courses offered concurrently with the Clinical Medicine series. Pathophysiology at the molecular, cellular, organ, and total body levels will be discussed in each body system. Systems covered include (but are not limited to); dermatologic, endocrine, neurologic, psychiatric, musculoskeletal/rheumatologic, gastrointestinal, and geriatric.

    2 credits

  • Pharmacology and Therapeutics III (BIOL640)

    This is the third course in a series of three clinical pharmacology courses taught in a systems-based approach with the Clinical Medicine series. The course explores clinical implications of pharmacology focusing on, but not limited to, these areas: women’s health, pediatrics, surgery, ENT/ophthalmology/allergy, and emergency medicine.

    2 credits

  • Introduction to History and Physical Examination (PHAS601)

    This is the first of four sequential courses designed to facilitate the development of medical history taking, physical examination skills, patient communication, clinical problem solving, clinical procedures, and ethical/legal considerations for the physician assistant. This first course focuses on history taking and physical examination in the healthy adult.

    2 credits

    Corequisite Course: PHAS601L

  • Introduction to History and Physical Examination Lab (PHAS601L)

    Laboratory experience accompanying PHAS601.

    1 credits

    Corequisite Course: PHAS601

  • Patient Assessment and Diagnostics I (PHAS602)

    This is the second of four sequential courses designed to facilitate the development of medical history taking, physical examination skills, patient communication, clinical problem solving, clinical procedures, and ethical/legal considerations for the physician assistant. Focus is on physical examination skills and procedures that coincide with topics in PHAS612.

    2 credits

    Corequisite Course: PHAS602L

  • Patient Assessment and Diagnostics Lab I (PHAS602L)

    Laboratory experience accompanying PHAS602.

    1 credits

    Corequisite Course: PHAS602

  • Patient Assessment and Diagnostics II (PHAS603)

    This is the third of four sequential courses designed to facilitate the development of medical history taking, physical examination skills, patient communication, clinical problem solving, clinical procedures, and ethical/legal considerations for the physician assistant. Focus is on physical examination skills and procedures that coincide with topics in PHAS613.

    3 credits

    Corequisite Course: PHAS603L

  • Patient Assessment and Diagnostics Lab II (PHAS603L)

    Laboratory experience accompanying PHAS603.

    1 credits

    Corequisite Course: PHAS603

  • Patient Assessment & Diagnostics III (PHAS604)

    This is the fourth of four sequential courses designed to facilitate the development of medical history taking, physical examination skills, patient communication, clinical problem solving, clinical procedures, and ethical/legal considerations for the physician assistant. Focus is on physical examination skills and procedures that coincide with topics in PHAS614.

    1 credits

    Corequisite Course: PHAS604L

  • Patient Assessment and Diagnostics Lab III (PHAS604L)

    Laboratory experience accompanying PHAS604.

    1 credits

    Corequisite Course: PHAS604

  • Foundation to Clinical Medicine (PHAS611)

    Designed as an introduction to clinical medicine topics, this course will lay the foundation for future clinical medicine courses by helping the student understand and apply fundamental concepts to patient care. Topics presented include radiological imaging, infectious disease, oncology, genetics, and fundamentals of pharmacology, immunology, preventative medicine, and laboratory studies.

    4 credits

  • Clinical Medicine I (PHAS612)

    This course is the first of a three-course sequence, which provides students with a systematic approach to the etiology, epidemiology, manifestations, laboratory and diagnostic studies, prognosis, and treatment of disease. This course will focus on, but is not limited to, hematological, cardiovascular, pulmonary, genitourinary, and renal systems.

    6 credits

  • Clinical Medicine II (PHAS613)

    This course is the second of a three-course sequence, which provides students with a systematic approach to the etiology, epidemiology, manifestations, laboratory and diagnostic studies, and prognosis and treatment of specific diseases. This course will focus on, but is not limited to, dermatologic, endocrine, neurologic, psychiatric, musculoskeletal, rheumatologic, gastrointestinal systems, and geriatrics.

    7 credits

  • Clinical Medicine III (PHAS614)

    This course is the third of a three-course sequence, which provides students with a systematic approach to the etiology, epidemiology, manifestations, laboratory and diagnostic studies, and prognosis and treatment of specific diseases. This course will focus on, but is not limited to: women’s health, pediatrics, ENT/ophthalmology/allergy, surgery, and emergency medicine.

    5 credits

  • Evidence-Based Medicine and Research I (PHAS620)

    This course facilitates student’s ability to effectively identify, appraise, and apply medical literature to health care practices. Students will also begin work on an original, publishable article for a peer-reviewed journal.

    3 credits

  • Clinical Reasoning I (PHAS625)

    Designed for first-year physician assistant (PA) students, this course is the first of two Clinical Reasoning courses designed to develop PA students’ problem-solving, patient assessment, and interpersonal communication. Using problem-based learning methods, this course corresponds with modules of PA clinical medicine and exposes students to an array of medical, social, and ethical issues.

    2 credits

  • Clinical Reasoning II (PHAS627)

    Designed for first-year physician assistant (PA) students, this course is the second of two Clinical Reasoning courses designed to develop PA students’ problem-solving, patient assessment, and interpersonal communication. Using problem-based learning methods, this course corresponds with modules of PA clinical medicine and exposes students to an array of medical, social, and ethical issues.

    2 credits

  • Patient-Centered Care and Applied Medical Ethics (PHAS630)

    Students interact with the concepts of cultural humility, diversity, social determinants of health, and patient advocacy. Students study the ethical dynamics of healthcare including principles of autonomy, beneficence, non-maleficence, justice, fairness and dignity. Learning is applied to realistic clinical and professional situations including inalienable rights, reproductive technologies, allocation of healthcare, death and dying, confidentiality, and professional conduct. Students will examine preventative medicine guidelines related to disease screening, risk identification, and risk stratification for diverse patient populations.

    3 credits

  • PA Professional Practice Issues (PHAS632)

    Designed for first-year graduate physician assistant (PA) students, this introductory course is the first of two professional issues courses to develop PA students’ awareness and professional attributes. Professional history, certification, PA professional organizations, and other health delivery topics will be discussed.

    2 credits

  • Clinical Rotation Skills and Orientation (PHAS635)

    Students will be presented with expectations for clinical rotations and future clinical practice, with a focus on professional behaviors, attitudes, and processes. Students will be required to demonstrate understanding of policies and requirements for successful completion of their clinical rotations, and will have the opportunity to interact with clinical faculty to prepare for the clinical year. Patient simulations will be used to develop and assess students’ clinical and professional skills.

    3 credits

  • Evidence-Based Medicine and Research II (PHAS640)

    This is the second course in the PA research sequence to build upon students’ application of medical literature to healthcare. Students will continue work on their capstone project, while learning about applied statistics and evidence-based medicine. Emphasis on application of EBM to clinical case studies related to risk management, patient safety, and quality improvement.

    3 credits

  • Clinical Field Placements I (PHAS710)

    Transition from didactic to clinical training. Assignment to a combination of clinical rotations selected from emergency medicine, family practice, internal medicine, women’s health, pediatrics, psychiatry/behavioral medicine, general surgery, and two elective rotations. Participation is required in the seven core/required rotations and two elective rotations by the end of the clinical field placement series.

    12 credits

  • Clinical Field Placements II (PHAS720)

    Ongoing clinical training. Assignment to a combination of clinical rotations selected from emergency medicine, family practice, internal medicine, women’s health, pediatrics, psychiatry/behavioral medicine, general surgery, and two elective rotations. Participation is required in the seven required rotations and two elective rotations by the end of the clinical field placement series.

    15 credits

  • Clinical Field Placements III (PHAS730)

    Ongoing clinical training. Assignment to a combination of clinical rotations selected from emergency medicine, family practice, internal medicine, women’s health, pediatrics, psychiatry/behavioral medicine, general surgery, and two elective rotations. Participation is required in the seven core/required rotations and two elective rotations by the end of the clinical field placement series. Includes program’s overall summative evaluation of student.

    9 credits

  • PA Capstone and Summative Exams (PHAS791)

    In this final course, students will review requirements for certification, licensure, and employment as a physician assistant. This course will mark the end of their capstone project and students will have the opportunity to present their findings to their research committee and guests. Students will complete a personalized plan for integrating faith with their medical practice. They will also complete the program’s summative assessment of their acquisition of program competencies.

    2 credits

 

Course Schedule

Students earning their M.S. in Physician Assistant degree at Bethel take 112 semester credits during the 27-month program. View the Course Schedule to see a breakdown of courses by year and term. Students take 15 months of courses followed by 12 months of clinical rotations in several different specialities.

Program Mission and Goals 

Learn more about the mission and goals of Bethel's physician assistant program.

Program Competencies

Read about the competencies graduates are expected to develop during the PA program.

Clinical Year Curriculum and Requirements

Learn about your clinical year rotations and requirements. 

Certifying Exam and Licensure

Read about the national Physician Assistant National Certifying Exam (PANCE) and Bethel graduates' pass rates. 

Program Policies

Find details about the PA program's policies regarding outside employment and advanced placement.